Duke Street Bridge Honored with Safety Award

 

Wider bridge improves access for emergency vehicles and pedestrians while reducing the likelihood of car accidents

 

The Duke Street Bridge replacement has been honored with a Road & Bridge Safety Award from the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association, County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania, and PennDOT.

Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. designed the project for Dauphin County, which improves safety for local residents in several ways:

  • It improves emergency access for residents who live near the bridge. The original Duke Street Bridge couldn’t carry vehicles weighing more than 3 tons, which meant most of the vehicles operated by the Hummelstown Borough Fire Company and Union Deposit Fire Company couldn’t use the bridge. The new bridge has no weight restrictions, and emergency vehicles can safely cross it (as shown in the attached photo).
  • It safely accommodates two lanes of traffic, whereas the original Duke Street Bridge was only wide enough for one lane of traffic at a time.
  • It makes it safer for drivers to turn onto South Hoernerstown Road from North Duke Street, thanks to increased intersection radii. Previously drivers of large vehicles turning right onto South Hoernerstown Road from Duke Street would cross into the opposing lane. Limited sight distance at this location meant that opposing traffic could not see these vehicles crossing over into their lane with optimum time to react. The new wider intersection will drastically reduce the likelihood of accidents at this location in the future.
  • It provides a new sidewalk. The previous Duke Street Bridge had no existing sidewalk; accordingly, pedestrians would often walk in the roadway lanes to cross from one municipality to the other.   The new bridge includes a sidewalk that will enhance safety for pedestrians trying to access the United Water Trailhead and Swatara Creek Trail.

 

ABOUT HRG

Founded in 1962, HRG has grown to be a nationally ranked Top 500 Design Firm, providing civil engineering, surveying and environmental services to public and private sector clients. The 200-person employee-owned firm currently has office locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. For more information, please visit the website at www.hrg-inc.com.

 

Michael Babusci to Lead HRG’s Transportation Practice Area

Michael Babusci

Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. (HRG) is pleased to announce that Michael Babusci has joined our team as Transportation Practice Area Leader.  In this role, he will oversee the delivery of all roadway, bridge, and traffic engineering services to clients throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia.

Babusci previously worked as program manager for the Allegheny County Department of Public Works in Western Pennsylvania.  There he was involved in a wide range of projects, including the county’s traffic count program, in-house paving program, and municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) program.  He also oversaw the review and approval of traffic impact studies, corridor studies, and roadway betterment design projects.

Babusci has more than 30 years of transportation engineering and management design experience.  His resume spans a broad range of public, private, and consulting organizations. He also taught graduate level courses in transportation design at Chatham University and the University of Pittsburgh.

“Michael’s diverse expertise will make him a great leader for our transportation group,” HRG’s Chief Technical Officer Brian Emberg says.  “He understands the issues that inform good transportation planning and design from every angle.”

Babusci will also play a key role in expanding HRG’s presence in Western Pennsylvania due to his prior experience working as a member of Allegheny County government and as a consultant for PennDOT, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, the City of Pittsburgh, the Port Authority of Allegheny County, the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh, and various municipalities and developers in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

 

ABOUT HRG

Founded in 1962, HRG has grown to be a nationally ranked Top 500 Design Firm, providing civil engineering, surveying and environmental services to public and private sector clients. The 200-person employee-owned firm currently has office locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. For more information, please visit the website at www.hrg-inc.com.

Park Boulevard Realignment in Hershey Honored with Safety Award

PSATS-Road-Bridge-Safety-Award-2017_Park-Boulevard_733x548 

Representatives of Derry Township in Dauphin County accept the first-place roadway award in the Road and Bridge Safety Improvement Awards at the Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors’ (PSATS) 95th Annual Educational Conference April 23-26 in Hershey. Sponsored by PSATS, the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association (PHIA), and the state Department of Transportation, the award recognizes townships for their extensive contributions to making roads and bridges safer. Participating in the presentation are, from left, PennDOT Director of Planning and Research Laine Heltebridle; Matthew Lena, P.E., transportation team leader, Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc.; Derry Township Chairman John Foley; PHIA Managing Director Jason Wagner; and PSATS Executive Board Member Bill Hawk. (Photo courtesy of the Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors.)

 

The realignment of Park Boulevard has been honored with a Road & Bridge Safety Award from the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association, Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors, and PennDOT.  The award was presented to Derry Township officials at the Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors Conference at the Hershey Lodge on April 24, 2017.

Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. designed the project for Derry Township and devised a creative funding strategy that expedited the project schedule.

A broad range of local leaders from Derry Township, Dauphin County, and area businesses worked together on this project to support future economic development in Hershey.  The new roadway provides several safety improvements:

  • It replaces a 60-year old bridge over Spring Creek, which was structurally deficient and weight-restricted.
  • It converts a narrow roadway beneath the Norfolk-Southern underpass from two-way traffic to one-way traffic. (The roadway is not wide enough for two opposing lanes of traffic to safely pass each other, so switching to one-way traffic will prevent vehicle conflicts.)
  • It improves emergency response time by adding a roadway connection from northbound Park Boulevard.  (Previously, first responders had to drive a circuitous route through several intersections to access this area. Now crews can reach the area 2-3 minutes faster.)
  • It provides a new sidewalk that will enhance safety for pedestrians traveling to Hershey’s attractions from downtown.
  • It adds a safe zone for people boarding and exiting buses at the Hershey Intermodal Transportation Center. This zone is physically protected from through-traffic.

The realigned Park Bouelvard was completed and opened to traffic in the fall of 2016.  View a slideshow of project photos below.

 

 

Dauphin County Infrastructure Bank Honored with Governor’s Award

Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. (HRG) is pleased to announce that our client Dauphin County received a Governor’s Award for Local Government Excellence for the infrastructure bank program we helped them create. The award for “innovative community or government initiative” was presented to Dauphin County officials at the Governor’s Residence on April 12, 2017. Commissioners George Hartwick, Jeff Haste, and Mike Pries attended the ceremony with George Connor, the executive director of Dauphin County’s Department of Community and Economic Development and the administrator of the infrastructure bank program.

HRG worked with PennDOT and Dauphin County officials to develop this program, which provides a creative solution to one of local government’s biggest challenges: successfully maintaining and replacing infrastructure. It leverages the county’s Liquid Fuels funding and the underutilized Pennsylvania Infrastructure Bank program to stretch the value of local government dollars. In its first three years, Dauphin County turned an annual investment of $325,000 in Liquid Fuels money into 10 projects worth $11 million: 7 bridges, 1 streetscape, 1 intersection improvement, and 1 traffic signal improvement.

DCIB turns 325K into 10 projects worth $11M

While people on both sides of the aisle agree that infrastructure improvements are badly needed, the debate often stalls over where the money will come from to pay for these improvements. The Dauphin County Infrastructure Bank shows that new revenue is not necessarily needed to begin addressing these problems; applying existing revenue in new ways can help us make significant progress. By combining several sources of funding – each of which would’ve been inadequate to meet the infrastructure need alone – the Dauphin County Infrastructure Bank has accomplished so much more for the county’s residents than these funding sources could’ve done individually.

Brian Emberg is an engineer who helped develop this program. He began working with the county in the 1980s on a similarly forward-thinking program that helped the county eliminate significant structural deficiency of its bridges. (In 1984, one-third of the county’s bridges were structurally deficient, but today the county has no load-posted, structurally deficient bridges at all, thanks to a bridge management system they designed with HRG.)

Emberg says, “Dauphin County’s officials are dedicated public servants and true visionaries. They continually challenge the status quo to deliver the best service to their constituents for the highest return on public tax dollars. This program provides a great example to other counties on how the seemingly impossible task of addressing our infrastructure can be solved.”

Indeed, HRG is currently in talks with counties around the state about implementing similar infrastructure bank programs of their own. Though Dauphin County uses its program for transportation improvements, the program can be used to fund any type of infrastructure, depending on the sources of money used to capitalize the loan program. For more information about the program, read our white paper on county infrastrastructure banks.

  • Projects funded by the Dauphin County Infrastructure Bank

    Middletown Borough Streetscape

  • Projects funded by the Dauphin County Infrastructure Bank

    Londonderry Township culvert

 

ABOUT HRG
Originally founded in 1962, HRG has grown to be a nationally ranked Top 500 Design Firm, providing civil engineering, surveying and environmental services to public and private sector clients. The 200-person employee-owned firm currently has office locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. For more information, please visit the website at www.hrg-inc.com.

 

County Infrastructure Banks make local roadway, bridge, and stormwater improvements easier and more affordable.

With a County Infrastructure Bank, local government officials have a renewable funding source that can:

  • Multiply the return on a small investment: completing several projects for less than the cost of one. (Dauphin County has successfully taken an annual allocation of $325,000 – not even enough to fund one single-span bridge replacement – and used it to fund 10 projects in just three years.)
  • Offer unbeatably low interest rates (0.5%) to your local municipalities.
  • Promote economic growth by providing a funding pool for infrastructure needs that often prevent development projects from getting off the ground.
  • Provide both funding and project delivery support to municipalities that otherwise wouldn’t have the resources or staff to complete complex infrastructure improvements.
  • Target money to long-term, strategic planning goals for the region.

Download our white paper

 

Salem Overpass Project Honored at WV-ACEC Joint Transportation Forum

Salem Overpass Award from WV-ACEC Joint Transportation Forum

HRG’s Morgantown Office Manager Samer Petro was proud to accept this award for the Salem Overpass Bridge project at the West Virginia – ACEC Joint Transportation Forum banquet. He is pictured here with Stephen Todd Rumbaugh, P.E., deputy state highway engineer of the West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of Highways.

The project involves the replacement of dual structures carrying eastbound and westbound US Route 50 over WV 23 in Harrison County, West Virginia. It is slated for construction in 2017 and was a finalist in the Large Bridge category.

Thank you to the West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of Highways, for nominating us for this award.

Van Voorhis Trailhead Featured in West Virginia Executive Magazine

Van Voorhis Trailhead in WV Executive magazineHRG’s Morgantown Office Manager Samer Petro wrote an article about our Van Voorhis Trailhead project for the Summer 2016 issue of West Virginia Executive magazine.  The article is shared here with their permission and is also available in the online edition of their magazine.

Visit the Van Voorhis Trailhead on a sunny weekend afternoon, and you will find it packed with locals of all ages. College students, families and seniors alike use the trailhead to experience nature and keep fit, and each one sees it as a valuable recreational asset in the community.

As they admire the greenery along the trail, it’s probably hard for them to imagine that the site used to be the home of a manufacturing facility with potential environmental contaminants, but just three years ago, that’s exactly what it was.

The location of the Van Voorhis Trailhead is the former site of the Quality Glass manufacturing facility, which operated there from the 1930s until the late 1980s. For years the site sat vacant, as former manufacturing facilities often do, since potential owners feared environmental liabilities associated with its previous use.

Monongalia County Commission officials recognized the site’s potential for redevelopment that could benefit the community, and they commissioned an environmental assessment to begin the process of clearing it for new construction. According to the report they commissioned, arsenic, lead and benzo(a)pyrene were among the chemicals present.

In 2012, the Monongalia County Commission used an Environmental Protection Agency Brownfields Cleanup Grant to remediate the site by placing a clay soil cap over the property and covering it with new top soil. They then agreed to deed restrictions that would prevent anyone from breaching the cap and potentially releasing contaminants. The deed also restricted withdrawing groundwater from the site for any purpose except monitoring and remediation.

With the remediated brownfield area cleared for redevelopment, the Monongalia County Commission began seeking an organization to redevelop the property, and the Mon River Trails Conservancy approached them with a vision of a new trailhead that would link the community to the Mon River Rail-Trail. This 48-mile trail links urban and rural communities in Marion, Monongalia and Preston counties and provides an outlet for walking, cycling, running, jogging and cross-country skiing to its inhabitants. Eight miles of the trail are paved, allowing for inline skating as an additional use.

To make the trailhead truly useful for guests, the Mon River Trails Conservancy wanted to expand parking on the site and add restroom facilities. It sounds simple enough, but due to the site’s former use and its location within a flood plain, engineers had to accommodate numerous environmental constraints. In designing the site, they needed to balance the needs to locate the restroom facility outside the flood plain and provide accessibility for those with disabilities while also siting the facilities in a way that avoided contact with contaminated material. They also had to locate the restroom facility to take advantage of the prevailing wind on site because the Mon River Trails Conservancy wanted to construct what is known as a sweet smelling toilet at the trailhead as an environmentally friendly, sustainable restroom facility. This waterless restroom technology, which was originally developed by the U.S. Forest Service, eliminates the odor typically associated with traditional outdoor restroom facilities when properly sited and vented.

The Van Voorhis Trailhead now has a parking lot that can accommodate up to 32 cars, including several handicap-accessible parking spaces; connecting pathways; landscaping; a trail map kiosk and a sweet smelling toilet facility for rail-trail users.

“This work has transformed a degraded, abandoned property into a valuable, useable site for trail access,” says Ella Belling, Mon River Trails Conservancy’s executive director. “It has not only had a positive impact on reducing public exposure to contaminants through the remediation process but has allowed for new community investments that will soon also include a canoe and kayak launch for the Upper Mon Water Trail.”

The Van Voorhis Trailhead project was designed by Morgantown-based civil engineering firm Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. and was partially funded by a grant from the Federal Highway Administration’s Recreational Trails Program, as administered by the West Virginia Department of Transportation’s Division of Highways. Other contributing partners include project contractor AllStar Ecology, LLC; the Town of Star City; the Monongalia County Commission; the North Central Brownfield Center; the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and the Mon River Trails Conservancy.

 

Unionville Road Honored with Road & Bridge Safety Award

photo courtesy of the Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors

Cranberry Township Wins 2016 Road and Bridge Safety Award

Left to Right: PSATS First Vice President Shirl Barnhart, PHIA Managing Director Jason Wagner, Cranberry Township Chairman Dick Hadley, Cranberry Township project engineer Kelly Maurer, project engineer Jeff Mikesic of Herbert, Rowland, & Grubic, Inc., PennDOT Deputy Secretary for Planning James Ritzman, president of the Springfield Manor Homeowners Association Steve Nalepa, and Cranberry Township Manager of Streets and Properties Bob Howland.

 

Cranberry Township was honored with a 2016 Road and Bridge Safety Award for the recently completed Unionville Road Reconstruction project. Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. (HRG) designed this project for Cranberry Township (Butler County), and Youngblood Paving was the project contractor.

The Road and Bridge Safety Award winners were announced at the annual Pennsylvania Association of Township Supervisors conference on April 19. Winners are selected annually by the Pennsylvania Highway Information Association, the Pennsylvania Association of Township Supervisors, and PennDOT.  Projects are chosen based on their improvement to public safety and their benefit to the local community and its economy.

Prior to this project, Unionville Road had been the site of numerous accidents. Frequently, drivers were traveling too fast and colliding with objects such as utility poles and guiderail.  Cranberry Township moved quickly to improve safety by realigning the roadway to remove a dangerous curve, widening it, and correcting drainage issues.  HRG designed the project in just eight weeks, so that the project could be bid and constructed before the end of the year. There have been no reported accidents at this site since the improvements were constructed, and the township has received positive feedback from its residents on the initiative.

Cranberry Township manager Jerry Andree is proud of the project’s success and says, “Thanks to the support of our residents, we’ve been able to take a very proactive approach to maintaining and improving township roadways. This project has greatly enhanced the safety of drivers in our community, and that is the greatest reward of all.”

 

ABOUT HERBERT, ROWLAND & GRUBIC, INC.

Originally founded in 1962, HRG has grown to be a nationally ranked Top 500 Design Firm, providing civil engineering, surveying and environmental services to public and private sector clients. The 200-person employee-owned firm currently has office locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. For more information, please visit our website at www.hrg-inc.com.

 

HRG Honored as Employer of the Year by Women’s Transportation Seminar

HRG accepts WTS Employer of the Year award

Left to Right: Michelle Madzelan, Andrew Kenworthy, Secretary of Transportation Leslie Richards, and WTS President Crystalann Deardorff

 

The Central Pennsylvania chapter of WTS has named Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc. (HRG) its 2016 Employer of the Year.

WTS (or Women’s Transportation Seminar) is an international organization that promotes the advancement of women in the transportation industry. Each year, its local chapters recognize employers who enhance the transportation industry through a commitment to excellence and quality, have an outstanding record of affirmative action in hiring and promotions, support continuing education, and encourage women students to enter the transportation field by providing internship opportunities.

HRG Vice President Andrew Kenworthy accepted the award at a ceremony at the Radisson Hotel Harrisburg on Wednesday, February 10, 2016.

“HRG is proud of this honor,” Kenworthy says. “Women contribute so much to our company’s success and play a vital role in the transportation industry.  Engineers must solve complex challenges every day, and we believe a diverse workforce is crucial to the creative thinking this field requires.”

 

ABOUT HERBERT, ROWLAND & GRUBIC, INC.

Originally founded in 1962, HRG has grown to be a nationally ranked Top 500 Design Firm, providing civil engineering, surveying and environmental services to public and private sector clients. The 200-person employee-owned firm currently has office locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. For more information, please visit our website at www.hrg-inc.com.

Myer Promoted to Manage HRG’s Transportation Division in Pittsburgh Region

Darren Myer, P.E., has been promoted to be the regional manager of transportation services in HRG’s Pittsburgh office. As such, he will oversee sales, staff, and project delivery for all roadway, traffic, and bridge engineering projects the firm completes throughout Western Pennsylvania.

Myer earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from The Pennsylvania State University and is a registered professional engineer. He has 16 years of experience in transportation engineering for roadway, traffic, and bridge projects and has served a wide variety of municipal and private sector clients. He joined HRG in 1999 as a staff professional and was previously promoted to project manager in 2004.

HRG’s Projects Recognized with 2014 Dauphin County Premier Project Awards

Pictured from left to right: Timothy Reardon, Executive Director, TCRPC; William Swanick, Regional Service Group Manager, HRG; Robert Grubic, President/CEO, HRG; Brian Emberg, Sr. VP/CTO, HRG; Andrew Kenworthy, Regional VP, HRG; Jamie Keener, Sr. Sales Executive, HRG; Leah Pearlman-Storch, Dauphin County Planner, TCRPC

Two of Herbert, Rowland & Grubic, Inc.’s (HRG) projects received 2014 Dauphin County Premier Project Awards. On Tuesday, January 13, 2015, Dauphin County Commissioners and the Dauphin County Planning Commission held the third annual awards event to recognize improvements that promote smart growth and revitalization within local communities.

HRG is proud to have provided engineering, surveying, and related services throughout the planning, design, and construction of the following award-winning projects.

Derry Township’s recently improved PA 743 and U.S. Route 422 historic square
The Hershey Square, was honored in the “Revitalization” category for projects above $500,000. This large-scale $13 million project is the first phase of a comprehensive plan to upgrade the existing 100-year-old transportation system within the world-renowned Hershey, Pennsylvania. Vast improvements were incorporated to keep pace with the increased traffic flow resulting from this thriving community and popular tourist destination.

Dauphin County Industrial Development Authority’s Solar Farm was recognized in the “Infrastructure” category. This project advances the use of alternative energy in Central Pennsylvania through the creation of one of the largest municipally-owned solar generation farms in Pennsylvania. This initiative is decreasing dependence on fossil fuels and generating revenue to significantly offset the County’s operational costs by 40%.

“We extend our congratulations to Derry Township and Dauphin County Industrial Development Authority for their forward-thinking approach and to improving the wellbeing of their communities,” stated Brian D. Emberg, HRG’s Senior Vice President and Chief Technical Officer. “It was a sincere honor to be a part of these commendable initiatives.”

 

ABOUT HRG

Originally founded in 1962, HRG has grown to be a nationally ranked Top 500 Design Firm, providing civil engineering, surveying and environmental services to public and private sector clients. The 200-person employee-owned firm currently has office locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia.